Secco

Secco can be a light alternative to sparkling wine whenever you feel like celebrating with others.

Facts

  • 6 - 8° degrees

    are ideal drinking temperatures

  • < 35 g/l

    of residual sugar is considered as "dry"

  • 1 - 2,5 bar

    pressure

With relatively low alcohol, a Secco is recommended as an ideal summer aperitif, which does not put as much strain on the body even in hot temperatures. Served cool at around 6-8 ° C, it is particularly refreshing. Seccos are now part of the standard repertoire for many German winegrowers.

How is Secco different

According to German Wine Law, semi-sparkling wine is defined as wine which has an excess of carbon dioxide compared to still wines. While most of the CO2 escapes during the fermentation of grape must to wine, for the preparation of high-quality Seccos, this is captured and put back into the wine after fermentation.

If CO2 from sources other than the wine itself are added, then it must be declared as "semi-sparkling wine with added carbon dioxide." This carbonation method is only used in the simplest semi-sparkling wines. Seccos have only 1 to 2.5 bar pressure, while sparkling wine contains at least 3, and up to 6, bar of carbonic acid pressure. An important distinction between seccos and sekt, or sparkling wine, is that in the latter, the CO2 comes from a second fermentation.

Seccos don’t need to use a wire cage (muselet) over the cork, like with sparkling wine, but are mostly closed with either a screw cap or a cork with foil or string.

Levels of sweetness for semi-sparkling wines

    Dry: up to 35 g / liter residual sugar content
    Semi-dry: 33 - 50 g / liter residual sugar content
    Mild: > 50 g / liter residual sugar

Is Secco the same as Prosecco?

No! Prosecco comes from Italy, is pressed from the Glera grape variety and may only be produced in the DOC Prosecco. It is available as sparkling, semi-sparkling and still wine. Meanwhile in Germany, Secco is a sparkling wine with technically added carbon dioxide.

Tips from Japanese cuisine JAPAN : Soy braised pork

German wines have a natural advantage when it comes to entering into perfect harmony with selected Asian dishes. With a lighter alcohol content, sometimes crisp acidity, moderate residual sweetness or soft tannins in the case of red grape varieties, they are a perfect match for a wide range of styles of Asian cuisine.

  • 1 kg Pork belly
  • 120 ml German white wine
  • 80 ml Soy sauce
  • 80 ml Honey
  • 50 ml Water
  • 4 cm Leek (green part)
  • 3 Ginger (thin slices)
  • 4 Boiled eggs
  • 1 Vegetables such as Chinese cabbage

PREPARATION

 

1. Cut the pork belly into large pieces to fit your pan.

Put the frying pan on high heat. When it gets hot, add pork belly, browning all sides, and then put in a saucepan. Add enough water to completely cover the meat.

Add ginger and leek and put on high heat.


2. When it starts to boil, turn the heat down low and boil for around 1.5 hours until the meat is soft (test with a fork). If it is drying out, add more water and let the dish boil slowly.


3. Let the soup cool down, then remove the meat and cut into blocks of about 4-5 cm square. (If you cool it down well at this stage, the meat will not become dry.)


4. Put meat and all the other seasoning except soy sauce, into a new pan (which fits the meat neatly) and heat. When it boils, turn the heat to low and cook for around 5 mins, then add soy sauce.


5. Place a plate, which fits snugly into the pan, directly on the meat (a drop lid is also acceptable). Boil for about 30 minutes.


6. Remove pork from the pan, put the boiled eggs and green vegetable to season them, and boil the broth to half the volume.

Put the meat back in and mix well with the broth. Put meat on a plate, add boiled egg or boiled green vegetables and pour over broth.

 

 

  • Lemberger (trocken)
  • Dornfelder (trocken)
  • Spätburgunder / Pinot Noir (trocken)
  • Lemberger (halbtrocken & feinherb)
  • Dornfelder (halbtrocken & feinherb)
  • Spätburgunder / Pinot Noir (halbtrocken & feinherb)

Tips from Asian cuisine CHINA : Dumpling

German wines have a natural advantage when it comes to entering into perfect harmony with select Asian dishes. With a lower alcohol content, sometimes crisp acidity, moderate residual sweetness or soft tannins in red grape varieties, they are a perfect match for a variety of styles of Asian cuisine.

  • 500g Flour
  • 240ml Warm water
  • 400g Minced pork
  • 100g Celery
  • 1 TL Salt
  • 1/2 TL Sugar
  • 3 EL Light soy sauce
  • 1 EL Oyster sauce
  • 2 EL Oil
  • 100 ml Water

PREPARATION

 

MAKE DUMPLING WRAPPERS

Pour flour into a large bowl, add 240ml warm water and stir until well-combined.

Wash and dry hands. Dip in some dry flour and knead the dough until it becomes smooth.

Place the dough in a bowl, cover with plastic wrap and set aside for 1 hour.

 


MAKE DUMPLING STUFFING

Mix minced pork, salt, sugar, light soy sauce, oyster sauce, oil and 100ml water, stir well and refrigerate for 2 hours.

Chop the celery and pat dry with kitchen towel.

Take the pork out of the fridge, add chopped celery and stir well.

 


MAKE DUMPLINGS

Divide the dough into 8g pieces.

Rub the dough with a rolling pin and press into a circle about 7cm in diameter.

Take 15g stuffing and put it in the center of the dumpling wrapper. Fold the wrappers, use fingers to press the edges together.

 


BOIL DUMPLINGS

Fill in a clean pot with water, and bring to the boil. Pour in an appropriate amount of dumplings according to the size of the pot, and boil them until they rise to the surface.

Take out the dumplings and serve.

  • Pinot Blanc (trocken)
  • Pinot Blanc (halbtrocken & feinherb)
  • Silvaner (trocken)
  • Silvaner (halbtrocken & feinherb)
  • Spätburgunder / Pinot Noir (trocken)
  • Spätburgunder / Pinot Noir (halbtrocken & feinherb)